ANS Task Force
Rusty Crayfish
( Orconectes rusticus )

New Zealand MudsnailDESCRIPTION: Rusty crayfish live in lakes, ponds and streams, preferring areas with rocks, logs and other debris in water bodies with clay, silt, sand or rocky bottoms. They typically inhabit permanent pools and fast moving streams of fresh, nutrient-rich water. Adults reach a maximum length of 4 inches. Males are larger than females upon maturity and both sexes have larger, heartier, claws than most native crayfish. Dark “rusty” spots are usually apparent on either side of the carapace, but are not always present in all populations. Claws are generally smooth, with grayish-green to reddish-brown coloration. Adults are opportunistic feeders, feeding upon aquatic plants, benthic invertebrates, detritus, juvenile fish and fish eggs.

PATHWAYS/HISTORY: The native range of the rusty crayfish includes Ohio, Tennessee, Kentucky, Indiana, Illinois and the entire Ohio river basin. However, this species may now be found in Michigan, Massachusetts, Missouri, Iowa, Minnesota, New York, New Jersey, Pennsylvania, Wisconsin, New Mexico and the entire New England state area (except Rhoda Island). The Rusty crayfish has been a reported invader since at least the 1930’s. Its further spread is of great concern since the prior areas of invasion have led to severe impacts on native flora and fauna. It is thought to have spread by means of released game fish bait and/or from aquarium release. Rusty crayfish are also raised for commercial and biological harvest.

RISKS/IMPACTS: Rusty crayfish reduce the amount and types of aquatic plants, invertebrate populations, and some fish populations--especially bluegill, smallmouth and largemouth bass, lake trout and walleye. They deprive native fish of their prey and cover and out-compete native crayfish. Rusty crayfish will also attack the feet of swimmers. On the positive side, rusty crayfish can be a food source for larger game fish and are commercially harvested for human consumption.

MANAGEMENT: Rusty crayfish may be controlled by restoring predators like bass and sunfish populations. Preventing further introduction is important and may be accomplished by educating anglers, trappers, bait dealers and science teachers of their hazards. Use of chemical pesticides is an option, but does not target this species and will kill other aquatic organisms.

WHAT YOU CAN DO: Do not use rusty crayfish as bait in areas where it is not native. Never transport bait from one water body to another. Discard your bait in the trash before leaving. Never release pet crayfish (or any other organisms) into the wild.

PROFILE CREDIT: Dian Smith/Barry Payne, USACE - IMAGE CREDIT: USACE


HOME - ANS - TASK FORCE - PREVENTION - MONITORING - CONTROL - EDUCATION - RESEARCH
Member Agencies
Copyright © 2005 - United States Federal Aquatic Nuisance Species Task Force - All Rights Reserved
U.S. Fish & Wildlife Service EPA APHIS Army Corps of Engineers Coast Guard National Park Service USGS State Department NOAA DOT Bureau of Land Management Bureau of Land Mangement Fish & Wildlife Service Bureau of Reclamation Forest Service